Is your job making you miserable? Get support from EAP

Moving from Corporate to Business

If you’d rather watch the Facebook Live video of this content, please here. You don’t have to have a
Facebook account to watch this.

I’ve been writing in the last few blog posts about what to do if your job makes you miserable, and more specifically, who to talk to and how to do that.

In this post, I’d like to mention EAP, which is the Employee Assistance Program. If you are a Government employee, EAP is a great source of support from trained counsellors and psychologists.

The great thing about EAP is that it’s free, and open to your family members as well as you.

I have used the service myself, and found it very helpful when I was going through the redundancy process. The psychologist I spoke to was able to give me some really good strategies for coping with being in the office during my redeployment period.

I really recommend EAP as a great service for finding someone to talk to who is outside your workplace and not emotionally involved, who can give you some great coping strategies for whatever you’re going through at work. Just get the number from your HR area.

Until my next blog post, have a great day, and #DoWhatYouLove

Does Your Job Make You Miserable? you are not alone

Moving from Corporate to Business

If you’d rather watch the Facebook Live video of this content, please here. You don’t have to have a
Facebook account to watch this.

If your job makes you miserable, remember that you are not alone. Many people are miserable in their jobs.

There’s a good chance that if you are miserable in your job, some of your colleagues probably are too. So, do some discrete asking around, and find people who are in the same position as you, and reach out to them for support.

Hopefully, you also have friends and family that you can reach out to for support as well. But remember not to dump everything on one person all the time, as it can get exhausting for them.

So, remember that you are not alone. Until my next post, have a great day and #DoWhatYouLove

Is Your Job Making You Miserabl? don’t talk about it on social media

Transition from the job you do to the job you love!

I thought I’d write a few blog posts about what you can do if your job makes you miserable. If you’d rather see the Facebook live video of this content, click here

I wanted to write these posts because so many people are miserable in their jobs. I know I was. Now, thankfully, I’m in a job that I love.

If your job makes you miserable, don’t post about it on social media. Seriously, don’t!

You never know who might see that tweet about how much you don’t like your boss, or that rant on Facebook about how much you hate your job. A friend of your boss might see that post, and pass it on!

If you are applying for jobs, this is particularly important, as there is nothing to stop a potential future employer from checking your social media profiles to see what sort of person you are. You wouldn’t want a future employer to decide not to employ you because they’ve seen a social media post from you complaining about your current job or employer. That future employer wouldn’t want you doing that about them!

If you want to tell someone about how miserable you are in your job, tell your best friend, or your dog, or cat, or pet lizard, or whatever pet you have. Pets are so wonderful aren’t they? You can cry on their shoulders, or tell them anything, and they’ll keep your secrets.

In my next blog post, I’ll offer some tips about who you can tell. Until then, have a great day and #DoWhatYouLove

I’ve discovered the secret to success – connection and communication

Personal Development for Career Professionals

Have you ever wondered why some people seem to lead a charmed life? Success in everything they do seems to come to them with little or no effort. It’s almost as if everything they touch turns to gold, and their communication with others is effortless.

I’ve certainly wondered why this happens to some people and not to others, especially me. However, I think I’ve just discovered the secret to their success. It’s the way they connect with others in their communication.

In his book “Everyone Communicates, Few Connect”, John C Maxwell says that people who seem to live a charmed life are usually those who have learned to connect with others. He goes on to say:

“When you connect with others, you position yourself to make the most of your skills and talents. When you don’t connect, you have a lot to overcome just to get to average, a neutral starting position.”

When I read this, I stopped to think about some of the successful people in my life – my cousin, who gets any job she applies for in any country; my school friend who, with no tertiary education, has never been without a well-paying job; and my business colleague who is so successful in her business that she can afford to live her life between 2 countries, despite only being in her 20’s. I thought about these people, and realised that the one thing they have in common is their extraordinary ability to connect with others.

John C Maxwell says that one way to connect with others is to make everything about them. Thinking back to the people I mentioned above, they all do this. They genuinely care for people, and always make the conversation about the person they’re talking to rather than about themselves. When I’m with any of them I always feel specially cared for, and that I’m the centre of their attention.

I’ve always felt that I’ve had to struggle for my successes in life. I rarely got promoted during my Government career, particularly when I was competing against people with equal qualifications. Also, I’m not someone who has ever been good at making, and keeping, friends.

I’ve come to realise that this is because I’m not particularly good at connecting with people. I can certainly talk, but I’m ashamed to say that I’m usually the topic of the conversation, or the conversation is about something that interests me. This has probably stemmed from being an only child, and having a disability. as a child, I’ was usually the centre of everyone else’s attention, and I don’t think I’ve ever really grown out of taking this for granted.

Recently, I attended a book launch and decided, as an experiment, to make every conversation I had focus entirely on the person I was talking to. I decided not to volunteer any information about myself unless I was asked, and to make a particular effort to find out as much as I could about each person I met. It was quite hard work, but ended up being a lot of fun! I met a number of really interesting people, and really enjoyed finding out all about them. This is something I’m definitely going to do a lot more of in my communication with others in the future. My aim is to become like the 3 people mentioned earlier in this post, and become a great connector.

Has anyone ever really connected with you? how did that make you feel? Please let me know in the comments section, or if you prefer, contact me directly.